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Hazelnut Nutrition Facts

Hazelnut Nutrition Facts

Who doesn't love the nutty chocolate truffles? And don't you prefer hazelnut spread? If you do, then read this NutriNeat article to know more about the nutrition facts and health benefits of hazelnuts.
Leena Palande
Hazelnuts are also known as Filberts or Cob nuts depending on their species. A cob is oval or spherical while a filbert is more elongated. After pollination, it takes about 7-8 months for the nut to ripe and fall out of the husk. Turkey is the largest producer of hazelnuts in the world. In the American states of Oregon and Washington, they are produced in large commercial quantities. Chile, Australia, and New Zealand are also some of the leading producers.
Common Uses
Hazelnut wood is used to make bows. The trees grow with fairly straight shoots and they have fine grains which make them suitable shaft material.
These nuts are mainly used in confectionery to make praline.
In chocolate industry, they are used in the form of pieces, powder, and paste (called dukka) for making different products like Nutella and chocolate truffles.
You may enjoy raw as well as roasted nuts as snacks, or you may use the paste over fruits, crackers, flatbreads, etc. You can add some powder to both sweet (cookies, muffins) and savory recipes.
The strongly flavored hazelnut oil is used as a cooking oil.
Hazelnut butter is considered as a pleasant and nutritious spread.
These nuts impart a nice flavor to coffee. Because of its unique flavor, hazelnut latte is so popular all over the world.
Nutrition Data
 Serving Size: 100 gm (3.5 oz) Hazelnuts
Water 5.31 g
Calories 628 kcal
Protein 14.95 g
Total lipid (fat) 60.75 g
Carbohydrate 16.70 g
Total Dietary Fiber 9.7 g
Total Sugars 4.34 g
                             Minerals
Calcium 114 mg
Iron 4.70 mg
Magnesium 163 mg
Phosphorus 290 mg
Potassium 680 mg
Sodium 0 mg
Zinc 2.45 mg
                              Vitamins
Vitamin C (total ascorbic acid) 6.3 mg
Thiamin 0.643 mg
Riboflavin 0.113 mg
Niacin 1.800 mg
Vitamin B6 0.563 mg
Vitamin A, RAE 1 µg
Vitamin A, IU 20 IU
Vitamin E (alpha-tocopherol) 15.03 mg
Vitamin K (phylloquinone) 14.2 µg
Folate 113 µg
                              Lipids
Total Saturated Fatty Acids 4.464 g
Total Monounsaturated Fatty Acids 45.652 g
Total Polyunsaturated Fatty Acids 7.920 g

The source of this nutrition information is USDA National Nutrient Database.
Health Benefits
Filbert properties were first pointed out by the Greek physician Dioscorides 1800 years ago. According to him, "It cures chronic coughing if pounded filbert is eaten with honey. Cooked filbert mixed with black pepper cures the cold. If the ointment produced by mashing burnt filbert shells in suet is smeared on the head where hair does not grow due to normal baldness or to some disease, hair will come again."
The hazelnuts nutrition facts show that they are rich in vitamin E and K which can keep your skin healthy and glowing.
The fiber from filberts can help prevent sudden rise in blood sugar levels. It helps maintain the health of the digestive system.
The nuts do not contain the hazardous elements sodium, cholesterol, and caffeine. Thus, they are 100 percent healthy.
Calories obtained from them can keep you fresh and energetic. They are a good source of energy with their 60.75% fat content.
They are packed with essential oils and supply a well-balanced mixture of vitamins and minerals. They contain more monounsaturated fat and less saturated fat.
A study conducted by Italian researchers has confirmed the presence of taxanes in shells and leaves of hazel plants. The finding of the essential elements in shells and leaves, which are usually considered as discarded material, is a good sign for the future availability of paclitaxel 'Taxol', a cancer medication.
They are a rich source of vitamin E which helps prevent oxidation of the polyunsaturated fats.
They are high in oleic acid, a monounsaturated fatty acid, which helps lower cholesterol.
Arginine, an amino acid present in them promotes relaxation of blood vessels and keeps your heart healthy.
Only a few nuts contain vitamin A, and hazelnuts are among them. Vitamin A is a natural antioxidant and has cancer-preventing properties.
They also provide you proteins but for that, combinations with other nuts, grains, or legumes are required so as to avail the maximum benefit. Protein is essential for cell growth and repair.
They rank number one among tree nuts in folate content. Folate is responsible for a decreased risk of neural tube birth defects and it also reduces depression.
They are rich in a number of minerals, particularly manganese, selenium, and zinc. The minerals calcium, magnesium, and potassium help lower cholesterol in the body. They help enhance the functions of various organs. Calcium strengthens bones and teeth.
They contain more monounsaturated fat and less saturated fat. This high level of monounsaturated fat is credit-worthy for a reduction in both total blood cholesterol and LDL (bad) cholesterol, provided the nuts are consumed as part of a low fat (saturated) diet.
Plant compounds such as carotenoids, flavonoids, and proanthocyanidins are the phytochemicals that play an important role in decreasing the risk of heart diseases, cancer, and other chronic diseases. The nuts have the highest proanthocyanidin content of any tree nut. These elements offer astringent flavor to foods and may help reduce the risk of blood clotting and urinary tract infections.
Taking into consideration the nutritional value and health benefits of hazelnuts, they are placed in a 'heart healthy' food group. You may consume them in their natural form, or may use the roasted or blanched ones, all are considered healthy for heart.