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Protein Content in Carrots

Protein Content in Carrots

Carrots are healthy root vegetables for deriving carbohydrates, vitamins, dietary fiber and minerals. But what is the protein content in carrots? How much protein in carrots is made available to our body on consuming them? To get your answers to these queries, read on.
Ningthoujam Sandhyarani
Carrots are included among the most popularly consumed vegetables known to us. They are available in colors of white, yellow, red, and purple shades, of which the dark yellow and orange-colored carrots are the most abundantly found varieties of carrots. These varied colored, enlarged and crunchy vegetables that taper at the base are taproots. They have a crisp flesh, which not only tastes great, but is also nutritious too. More info on protein content in carrots and general carrots nutrition are highlighted in the upcoming paragraphs.
How Much Protein is Present in Carrots?
Vegetables including carrots are generally touted as basic food items to be included in the daily diet plan. They are rich sources of vitamins, carbs, trace minerals and antioxidants, all of which are essential for staying healthy and fit in the long run. On top of these, the low-calorie, low cholesterol and low-fat foods consist of mainly fresh vegetables and fruits. Thus, veggies form the bulk of healthy eating and raw diet plan. Also, they are incorporated in many therapeutic diets, such as the calorie restriction diet, no fat diet and low sodium diet amongst others.
The health benefits of carrots are really impressive, especially in terms of improving eyesight, boosting digestive health and reducing weight. But the queries are about amount of protein in carrots, and whether we can use carrots in high protein diet or not. Generally speaking about the protein content in carrots, these root veggies along with majority of the vegetables are not sufficient enough to provide recommended amounts of protein (46 g per day required for adult women and 56 g daily for adult men). Yes, they do contain proteins, but in minimum quantities.
The amount of protein content in 1 cup serving size of raw, chopped carrots is approximately 1.1 g, whereas 100 g of raw carrots yield 0.6 g proteins. As far as protein in baby carrots (raw) is concerned, serving 85 g of the same gives 0.5 g protein. In short, baby carrots and matured carrots contain nearly the same amount of proteins. The proteins, isolated from carrots, are not of high quality or complete protein type. In other words, these root vegetables do not provide all the essential amino acids that we require to ensure normal functioning of the body processes.
Carrots should be a part of the diet plan, both for vegetarians and non-vegetarians to reap their nutrients. But baby carrots and matured carrots are not the type of foods, which we should rely on for getting proteins. To be precise, the protein content in carrots is low. Thus, to get the recommended amount, supplementation of other protein rich food items is a necessity. The choices include tofu, soybeans, dried beans, pulses, other seeds and nuts, dark green veggies (broccoli, spinach, asparagus), milk, dairy products, grains, eggs, poultry products and lean meat.
Carrots Calories and Nutrition Facts
Serving 1 cup of carrots is equivalent to providing 52 calories, which is definitely not a subject to worry about. Although maximum calories are contributed by sugar, there is no major health concern with inclusion of carrots in the daily diet plan. Like other highly pigmented, dark green or yellow veggies, carrots contain high amounts of beta carotene. The beta carotene serves as provitamin A and gets converted to vitamin A inside the body. Other nutrients present in carrots are carbohydrates, vitamins B1, B6, C and K, folate, magnesium, manganese and phosphorus.
Here's hoping that you got the answer to 'how much protein is present in carrots' and are clear about the nutrition facts about carrots. They contain negligible amounts of cholesterol and saturated fats. Thus, these root vegetables are definitely good foods for dieters. To conclude, eat carrots and other healthy food items to get balanced nutrients. You can add them raw in mixed vegetable salads, consume them alone or prepare juices out of them. For those who are fond of eating cooked carrots, do not make pieces before boiling or steaming. It reduces protein content to as much as 50%. So, make sure you adopt proper ways of consuming carrots to derive optimal nutrients from these root veggies.